Freedom Foundation

Media Mentions – Week of February 4, 2018

National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation – Federal Court Hears Uber & Lyft Drivers’ Lawsuit Challenging Seattle Forced Unionism Ordinance

Today, National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation staff attorneys are arguing Clark v. Seattle at the United States Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals for individual drivers whose federal lawsuit challenges a controversial Seattle ordinance designed to unionize independent for-hire and ride-sharing drivers and force them to pay union dues. Dan Clark, lead plaintiff in the suit, is an independent driver who picks up riders through both Uber and Lyft.

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Tri-City Herald – Lawmakers are trying to eliminate key part of public records law; we say that’s wrong

A proposal that would take a chip out of the state Public Records Act is on a legislative journey that needs to come to a halt.

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KNKX – Litigation Over Seattle Law Allowing Unionization For Ride-Share Drivers Continues

In a separate lawsuit, a group of drivers represented by the National Right To Work Legal Defense Foundation and local anti-union organization Freedom Foundation allege the city violated drivers’ privacy and First Amendment rights in addition to federal labor law.

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The Seattle Times – Legislators, don’t cave to in-home care union — reject bill that would increase DSHS costs

Outsourcing might be interesting if it would reduce costs and add efficiencies, but vendors told DSHS they will spend 40 percent more than the state to provide the service.

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The Daily News – Package of labor bills would boost local union membership

By shifting oversight to a private company, the law would pave the way for SEIU 775 to again require all caregivers serving Medicaid clients to pay union dues, said Maxford Nelsen, director of labor policy for the Olympia-based Freedom Foundation.

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The News Tribune – Tensions flare at Capitol after Democrats try to pass pro-union bills after midnight

Democrats in Washington’s Senate tried to advance controversial union-backed legislation Wednesday but debate was postponed after it stretched into the early-morning hours Thursday and sparked fierce backlash over transparency from Republicans who oppose the measures.

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Associated Press – Union-Backed Bill Spark Debate On State Senate Floor

Democrats in the state Senate tried to advance union-backed legislation but debate was postponed after it stretched into the early-morning hours Thursday.

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Seattle Times – Washington State Senate Democrats, Republicans Clash In Midnight Showdown Over Future Of Home Health-Care Workers

Like all high drama on the Washington Senate floor, the midnight dust-up on a bill to change a state-contracting process comes with a rich backstory.

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The News Tribune – Tensions Flare At Capitol After Democrats Try To Pass Pro-Union Bills After Midnight

Democrats in Washington’s Senate tried to advance controversial union-backed legislation Wednesday but debate was postponed after it stretched into the early-morning hours Thursday and sparked fierce backlash over transparency from Republicans who oppose the measures.

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NW News Network – Partisan Battle Erupts Over SEIU-Backed Homecare Bill In Olympia

A fiery partisan battle has erupted in Olympia over a union-backed measure involving homecare workers. Underlying the fight is whether these workers should be able to opt out of their union.

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The News Tribune – Unions: No Fair Play For Personal Information

One crucial fact omitted from your article about Senate Bill 6079 is that while unions pretend to be concerned about employee privacy, they routinely obtain lists of employees from the state which include personal information — such as home addresses — without employee permission.

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The Spokesman Review – Sue Lani Madsen: On revenge and accountability

“This will stick it to the Freedom Foundation.” Or so said a union lobbyist overheard in Olympia. It may or may not be an accurate quote, but it accurately describes House Bill 2587, cutting through legal obfuscation to accidentally tell the truth.

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